Five Pieces of Evidence Ferguson Grand Jury Saw

PHOTO: Ferguson, Mo. police officer Darren Wilsons firearm
Police officer Darren Wilson’s Sig Sauer .40 caliber firearm

Here are 5 pieces of evidence that the Ferguson grand jury saw, according to ABC News:

1) Police Car Damage

The police car’s driver-side window was shattered, and the driver-side mirror was bent towards the car, possibly indicating evidence of a fierce struggle between Wilson and Brown while the officer was still seated in his patrol car.

2) A Witness’ Journal Entry

A journal entry by someone police only identified as “Witness 44” said that Brown charged at Wilson, even after Wilson fired his gun. “The cop just stood there,” the entry read. “Dang if that kid didn’t start running right at the cop like a football player. Head down. I heard three bangs, but the big kid wouldn’t stop.”

3) Wilson’s Medical Examination

Wilson sustained bruising in the face, neck, and scalp areas after “he was hit in the face a couple of times,” according to a police report. Wilson also reported jaw pain, according to a medical examination report.

4) A DNA Analysis Report

A DNA analysis report revealed that Brown’s DNA was found inside Wilson’s car, on the officer’s shirt and pants, and the interior left front door handle.

PHOTO: Ferguson, Mo. police officer Darren Wilson is pictured in evidence photos released by the St. Louis County Prosecutors Office on Nov. 24, 2014.
Ferguson, Mo. police officer Darren Wilson

Brown’s blood was also found on Wilson’s gun, according to the police investigation. That evidence appeared to support Wilson’s claim that Brown punched the officer while Wilson was seated in his car and reached in and struggled over Wilson’s gun. Wilson said he fired twice while in the car.

5) Wilson’s Interview

Wilson testified before the grand jury that he perceived Brown as a direct threat. “He looked up at me and had the most intense aggressive face, it looks like a demon, that’s how angry he looked,” Wilson told the panel.

7 thoughts on “Five Pieces of Evidence Ferguson Grand Jury Saw

  1. I feel pawful fur this officer and his (new) wife- and his family. This officer was only doing what was required of him as an officer of the law and although its tragic what happened to the young man, it would have been prevented by his simply obeying the law and giving the Officer the respect that was due him. Now both families have been furever changed – because of one man’s disobedience.

  2. I never smile. People have to remind me to smile. I don’t know why. I’m happy.

    If I had an aggressive expression would they shoot me too? Smh.

    In Minnesota, Bryon Smith, 65, was sentenced to life without parole April 29, 2014 because he shot two teenagers that broke into his home.

    “Minnesota law allows a person to use deadly force for defense, but that action must be considered reasonable.”

    He was charged with premeditated MURDER. His actions were not considered REASONABLE.

    As an elderly person, it becomes harder to physically protect yourself. So you make sure that you have a way to do that. No one knows the fear he felt as he defended himself and his home that night. To him, his actions were reasonable.

    The public was outraged because they were children.

    I don’t care what the law saw says, when my daughter is 18, she will still be a child.

    Wilson’s actions were not reasonable. He didn’t shoot because he had to. He shot because he had the power.

    1. Wasn’t he the guy who stood over the wounded girl and gave her a “good, clean finishing shot” to the head?

      He didn’t have to do that when she was already lying on the floor. That’s why I think Smith’s actions were unreasonable.

      Yes, I agree Wilson’s actions were also unreasonable. Didn’t he have a billy club or taser?

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