New Play Depicts Scalia As Supreme Court’s ‘Originalist’

There is a new play out by John Strand called “The Originalist,” about the Supreme Court.  It takes a look at one of its real-life stars – Justice Antonin Scalia.

“Drama, suspense, monologues, arguments – what could be more theatrical than the U.S. Supreme Court?” asks NPR.

According to Wikipedia, Antonin Gregory Scalia (born March 11, 1936) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. As the longest-serving justice currently on the Court, Scalia is the Senior Associate Justice. He was appointed to the Court by President Ronald Reagan in 1986, and has been described as the intellectual anchor for the originalist and textualist position in the Court’s conservative wing.

Scalia is also known for his acerbic dissents.

He is, as the play’s title suggests, an “originalist” – He believes that the court should follow the original meaning or intent of the framers of the Constitution, which we see time and again in his decisions.

The Supreme Court justice is also a devout Catholic, a lover of opera and a man who likes a good debate.

The play shows the jurist both in and out of the courtroom.

It will premiere at the Arena Stage in Washington, D.C., this week.

(Updated post)

Seattle Coach Discusses Final Play Call In Super Bowl: MSNBC

Many people – amateures and experts alike – questioned the Seattle Seahawks’ final play on the goal-line in the Super Bowl.

Seahawks coach Pete Carroll – whose controversial goal-line call helped clinch the victory for the other team – tells TODAY’s Matt Lauer he’s been “sleeping some” in the days following the game. He says he remains confident that the call won’t haunt him.

MSNBC

Hugh Jackman In Broadway Play ‘The River’

New York

The Salt Lake Tribune States that before Hugh Jackman could appear in his current Broadway play, “The River,” he had to learn his lines, get into his character and do something he’s never done before: gut a fish.

His character is a fisherman who pulls out a real 3-pound sea trout, cuts it open with a fearsome knife, removes the internal organs, chops a fennel bulb, slips lemon slices into the skin and seasons the flesh before popping the dish in a fake oven.

It’s a mesmerizing scene and Jackman — the man who plays the sharp-clawed Wolverine in the movies — seems completely at ease as he unhurriedly prepares the fish like a Food Network veteran.

He wasn’t always so calm.

“I was originally a little nervous about it,” said Jackman over lunch in Manhattan.

“I’d never done it before and I knew it had to look like he’d been doing it his whole life.”

The Tribune state that Jackman did what any actor worth his salt does: he consulted chefs and practiced. He originally planned to gut a fish every day for months until it became second nature, but he was told that it was better to gut 40 in a single session.

He got out his knives and made fish fillets and fish sticks and fish soup. “There are fish cakes still frozen in my freezer,” he said, laughing. “No one’s having fish at my house for a long time.”

The scene comes in the middle of Jez Butterworth’s enigmatic play about love and repetition. Various women from the fisherman’s past enter and leave his remote fishing cabin, warping time and space.

“I think the more poetically you take the piece, and less literally you take the piece, the deeper you go with it,” Jackman said. “Ultimately, I think it’s a play that just spoke to me and my heart. I read it and I was like, ‘Wow. There’s something very true and real and honest about connection, about loss, about the search in life.’ That’s something that I’ve always had.”

Jackman, who plays the pirate Blackbeard in next year’s “Pan” and said he’s close to starring in an original movie musical about P.T. Barnum, threw himself into the new play. He spoke to memory experts and read works by psychotherapist Carl Jung.

To nail the fish preparation scene, Jackman consulted with a master — chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten.

“Perfect,” he said when his plate arrives over lunch with AP writer Mark Kennedy.  “I really love going to a three-star Michelin restaurant and they say, ‘You really must try the marmalade with your peanut butter.’”

“The River,” at Circle in the Square Theatre, has been a sellout, in part to Jackman’s star power. But even with his comfort in front of an audience, the fish-gutting scene didn’t go too smoothly when he first performed it, despite all the practice.

“I’ll admit: The first time I did it, I remember thinking, ‘My heart rate is about 75 beats a minute,’” said Jackman. Things got worse when he cut his thumb.