Info

Welcome to OK, Fine – reasonably liberal.  

Previously, this blog tried to assess what about political liberalism is reasonable, and what is unreasonable, and it also attempted to identify reasonable and unreasonable aspects of conservatism.

However, it is now changing formats to a “Cop Watch” type website.

Tom

(Updated)

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65 thoughts on “Info

  1. Hey, like the site. But you don’t allow comments after each post. I’m assuming that this is the way that you want it, but wouldn’t it be better to have feedback? And aren’t things like drugs and religion also social issues in this country?

    Not being contrary. Just askin…..

    1. Dear pressurevalve59,

      Comments go to me to be looked at and approved.

      It may take me some time to get to it, but I don’t think I’ve ever “not approved” a comment.

      Cheers

  2. Also, the articles are not going to be about religion, sex (abortion), or drugs. These are more “cultural” rather than political. Its about finding what people can agree on.

    Many conservatives might actually agree with some liberal policies if you remove certain things like guns, drugs, or religion.

    Look at the new pope. The man is all about helping the poor, income redistribution, etc. This is what I’m getting at.

    1. You say that drugs are more cultural than political.

      What could be more political and about policies, than the war on drugs that spends more than half of our law-enforcement dollars and ruins more families than addiction?

      Thanks for the follow…

      1. I think drugs kind of scare some conservatives. Many conservatives might agree with helping the poor, health insurance, etc. Look at the new pope – some have called him “marxist.”

        Look at solar and wind power – these things can save a person money (over the long run).

        Conservatives love to save money.

        I guess the point is to focus on topics that can possibly unite people – at least somewhat.

  3. For some reason, I can’t answer your response inline, so I’ll add it here.

    You wrote: “I think drugs kind of scare some conservatives.”, and “Conservatives love to save money. ”

    I’m a libertarian, but if I was conservative and read that, I’d see it as a very condescending and paternalist comment. Your views are like a cartoon caricature of political philosophies.

    “Look at the new pope. The man is all about helping the poor, income redistribution, etc”.

    Income redistribution is a very liberal position. The current pope is loved because he is such a refreshing change from the former pope, but not because of his well-known marxist views on economics. He’s loved because he isn’t living like a king, and he’s expressing more populist views, but if you ask conservatives or libertarians about income redistribution, you won’t find much agreement.

    But, as I’m not a conservative, it just offends me intellectually, and as it does, forgive me if I don’t feel your views are sufficiently thought out to want to further engage.

    The politics of envy and promises of government largesse are an easy sell to the lazy and the poorly informed.

    Not sure why you followed my blog. I show people how to play licks/solos and songs as I relearn them following a couple of strokes, but I really have no interest in following someone who thinks their sophistry is going to bring conservatives over to their way of thinking.

    1. The point isn’t to “convert” anyone.

      The point is to find common ground.

      As with everyone else, you are not forced to follow this blog.

      1. Can you find common ground when you write your points in such a way as to be either intentionally condescending, or ignorant of how they would be viewed by those you seek to reach?

        I appreciate your reaching out to me on my blog, and using your musical background to find common ground, but I’m just an amateur using music as a vehicle to motivate myself as I recover from a couple of strokes.

        Over the past few decades, like you, I traveled the world many times, but I wasn’t playing music, I was building a semiconductor business that grew to 3500 employees. That required over 200K miles per year for a couple of decades. I started it as an engineer, designing IC’s for commercial, industrial and consumer applications, and finished it with devices for space. To grow the company, I’ve dealt with local and federal governments in the U.S., Asia and Europe.

        You and I are unlikely to agree on solutions to problems, because I’ve seen what an impediment government bureaucrats are to starting and growing companies. At every turn, they have their hands out for cash.

        When governments grow so large that they are in a position to control the destiny of every person and business, they will not move without being bribed. It becomes a part of doing business. It doesn’t matter where, what the project was, building/licensing/registrations etc., there are bureaucrats all standing in the way unless you grease their palms.

        The press knows this, and are a part of it. Big-government begets more, not less corruption because you have people with no ability to produce, in charge of those who do, and they want a cut.

        Personally, I’m glad to be out of it all, because it is becoming such a problem, that it is crippling startups and investments in new tech.

        The U.S. is the only western democracy that taxes the offshore earnings of its companies. Then, President Obama complains that any company that merges and/or moves overseas to avoid that uncompetitive tax structure is “unpatriotic”.

        We have the highest corporate tax rate of any of our serious competitor nations, and we add to that by taxing the profits earned by U.S. companies in other countries, yet we expect our companies to remain competitive, and to remain here.

        This policy is economic suicide.

        You and I would probably agree on many things, but my view is that I’ve seen so much of how the world is run, that the average person, or even their friends and families combined, will see, that it is impossible to have meaningful exchange with most people.

        Do you think solar-panel technology is a green/environmental industry? It isn’t. Same for the new lightbulbs.

        The technology required to manufacture them requires much more resources, and very toxic resources at that, that you could never make up for it with energy savings.

        The energy savings are non-existent when you add in the additional equipment and energy necessary to manufacture the “green” technologies. Those are rarely considered when saying something is “energy” neutral or even has an advantage.

        There is so much technical nonsense being spread by people with zero understanding, that in my estimation, we are doomed.

        Take the ethanol situation. We ruined tens of thousands of older cars with the addition of ethanol. The destruction of those vehicles by ethanol, combined with the “cash for clunkers” program caused a shortage of used vehicles for the poorest among us, and was an environmental disaster because of the need to replace all those autos with new cars which all required the use of new resources and energy.

        The unintended consequences of decisions made by bureaucrats and politicians, most of whom are on the take, meaning making money off the decisions, is enormous and disastrous for us as a people, and for our economies.

        I could go on, but this should be sufficient to show why I’m not terribly interested in the views you’ve expressed. I see them as terribly naive.

        The politics of envy and promises of government largesse are an easy sell to those who are unmotivated and/or poorly informed.

      1. Thanks for your comment. I have taught English in Thailand and have also lived in Germany.

        Let’s look at solar. Due to economies of scale, prices for solar equipment has dropped significantly since the 70’s.

        CleanTechnica states they have fallen significantly in the past few years: “Solar PV Module Prices Have Fallen 80% Since 2008…”

        The Portland Business Journal states: “The cost of developing utility-scale solar projects fell a third since the 2007-2008 period and the report notes the performance of the installations has increased.”

        So, it looks like both the price of solar modules and the price of the entire project has decreased significantly since 2008.

        They also state: “…variations in local procedures can drive up to $900 in costs on a typical residential installation. The report found variations include not only permitting procedures but interconnection planning and zoning, net metering and financing influence the final installation cost.”

        So, it looks like regulation, financing and infrastructure play a role, too. With demand, infrastructure would catch up and regulation could be standardized, which would hopefully lower costs.

        CleanTechnica also states: Solar was the #2 Source Of New Electricity In 2013.

        German Solar Installations Priced at $2.24 per Watt (US Solar at $4.44 per Watt)

        Why is it cheaper in Germany? It is cheaper for legal reasons, subsidies and taxation. Also due to economies of scale.

        Total solar installations per quarter are about the same in the U.S. and Germany. But Germany has about one fourth the U.S. population – so the amount of solar power per capita is much higher in Germany.

        There is a lot of false media out there, much of it from – surprise – Fox News. Fox News claimed that solar works better in Germany than in the United States because “They’ve got a lot more sun than we do.”

        That’s absurd! Anyone who has been to Germany knows it is more cloudy over there than here.

        http://cleantechnica.com/2013/05/24/solar-powers-massive-price-drop-graph/
        http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/blog/sbo/2014/09/report-s-solar-energy-prices-drop-but-regulations.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+industry_24+(Industry+Green)
        http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2013/02/07/fox_news_expert_on_solar_energy_germany_gets_a_lot_more_sun_than_we_do_video.html
        http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2013/12/10/us_solar_industry_tops_germany_in_new_pvs_for_first_time_in_15_years.html

  4. There is nothing reasonably conservative about income redistribution unless one is a socialist. Since I work damn hard for my income, I don’t want it being given to some lazy person who can work but who choses to sit on their butt, make more babies to get more benefits from the state and uses my tax dollars to spend on expensive braid hairdos and ultra long expensive long finger nail manicures. I worked for Medicaid for years and know all about it. I know about income redistribution at its worst. I thank you for the follow. I don’t go into politics in public except for this one comment. and don’t even start on people who come to this country and refuse to learn English getting welfare from my income….

    1. I’ve been to Japan, too. I knew “sakura” is cherry blossom. I had to look up Kanzen. It looks like it means ” complete” or “perfect.”

      Anyway, income redistribution likely wouldn’t effect you if you are in the middle class – unless you are a wealthy millionaire.

      That’s how it works – no one will (or wants to) tax the middle class more or go after the middle class.

      1. Let’s put it this way: in the interest of objectivity, it is highly unlikely that politicians would go after the middle class.

        I guess you never know completely.

    1. Please see the other comments.

      Also, since you know about Japan, you must know that in other western (or industrialized) countries, some kind of aid for the poor or the jobless is par for the course.

      edited to add: industrialized

      1. I have no objection for assistance for those who cannot help themselves, who are seeking work and can’t find it, those who are medically disabled. I do object to lazy asses such as I have mentioned. Regladless of the country, and knowing Japan as I do, they also don’t care for income redistribution as they believe in personal property and responsible charity. I am not referring to this. I am referring to people who think they are entitled to money other people have worked hard for, simply because of some past grievance such as centuries ago they were slaves or because they feel simply entitled. I work for my money and it is mine. How I redistribute it, after the government has taken my money for taxes and to support useless lazy individuals, is my business and my call. it is no one else’s. If they want my money, they need to get off their butts and do my job and earn it.

      1. I haven’t heard of it, but eventfinder.com states: “NZ Sculpture OnShore 2014 runs for 10 days, from Thursday November 6th to Sunday, November 16th at the historic reserve above Narrow Neck Beach in Devonport, on Auckland’s North Shore.” It looks very nice.

      2. It was great! And despite terrible weather for much of it, we had record numbers of visitors and will probably raise a very healthy amount of money for women’s refuge!

  5. Hi “RL”, thanks for introducing yourself by following our site. Yours looks quite interesting and – we look forward to exploring it further. If you happen to be on facebook we invite you to visit the RAXA Collective page. See you there!

  6. Thanks for visiting. I find your blog interesting, but folks at my age tend to follow what they know best. Doesn’t mean an old dog can’t learn a new trick, but Democracy was defined for many of us through Civics and duty. Personally, I find few people are able to sort through their own agenda long enough to understand the big picture. We are at a time and place in history where we should not be preached to, but personally set a rationale example. This country is in a mess, the only way out is the surest and safest: respect one another, treat them as you wish to be treated, use your noggin, read and definitely research before accepting something as truth. Be a responsible citizen. Open your ears before you open your mouth. Be vigilant, aware that things are not always what they appear to be. Break bread with all, and try a bit of understanding. Never buy anything but the truth, trusting your instincts and the beauty of your faith. And last, but not least, don’t feed the frenzy, but stand as a citizen that believes in the values of the people and Democracy our country was founded upon. “United we stand, divided we fall.”

    P.S. There are more good people than bad.

      1. I do not look for the negative, and I refuse to give up on believing in people simply because their culture, lifestyle and religious beliefs differ from mine. I cannot judge if the court sits at 51 over 49. Each of us must choose to, “Stand for something, or you will fall for anything.” We can’t have it both ways. I’ve learned more by listening to people than I could ever have learned by reading volume after volume in the World’s greatest of libraries.
        My radar goes up when someone wishes to define for me what it is to be conservative, or liberal. Unfortunately, whether you intended to do that with your audience or not, the fact that you chose to “pick and choose” how to address their requesting of source material, left me to wonder what your true intention is.
        I’d be more attune to follow your site if you kept an open dialog for discussion, rather than to corral us and ask us to think about something in a controlled environment.

      2. Thank you for your comment. I’m not trying to pound anyone over the head with my beliefs. I tend to stay away from “social conservatism” or “social liberalism,” and instead concentrate more on economic, environmental, defense, and health care policy. I do get into race relations because it is such a hot topic. I rarely write about guns.

        You are welcome to comment on any post.

      3. Thank you for being a good sport about my concerns. I sincerely wish you success on your endeavor. Please take no offense to my questioning. I believe we all waver back and forth simply by the fact of how our lives have unfolded. Just do me a favor, believe there is more good in this world than bad. Believing is the cornerstone to bridging the gaps, building the bridges that are essential for all of mankind. “No man is an island.”

  7. Thanks for looking around. So the info page, I am interested in the stuff you propose the blog will cover, except war. If you avoid it , I would have followed you. Jai Ahimsa!

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