Death Toll Discrepancy With Suicide Attacks Near Fallujah

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has reportedly carried out a series of suicide / car bomb attacks on military convoys northeast and southeast of the city of Fallujah, killing at least 55 people, according to Al Jazeera.

Brigadier General Saad Maan Ibrahim, the spokesman for the Joint Military Command, told The Associated Press that 17 troops were killed in the attacks.

Three blasts on Tuesday hit Iraqi army convoys travelling in Anbar province to take part in a planned offensive aimed at retaking the provincial town of Ramadi from ISIS, Al Jazeera’s Imran Khan, reporting from Baghdad, said. He said that the attacks were a “very big blow” to the military.

ISIS has routinely used car bomb attacks to a “devastating effect” against Iraqi forces, he added.

“Car bombs have proven to be a very big problem for the Iraqi security forces,” said Khan. The tactic reportedly played a major part in the capture of Ramadi.

The bombings come as Iraqi forces prepare for a massive bid to retake Ramadi, which is the capital of the Sunni Anbar province.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2015/05/suicide-blasts-isil-iraq-fallujah-ramadi-150527080550499.html

Are There ‘Paid Commenters’ Who Comment On Articles On The Internet?

Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani claims that Nigerian propaganda campaigns extend all the way into online comments sections.

Wikipedia states: Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani “is a Nigerian novelist, humorist, essayist and journalist. Her debut novel, I Do Not Come to you by Chance, won the 2010 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best First Book (Africa), a Betty Trask First Book award, and was named by the Washington Post as one of the Best Books of 2009. Nwaubani is the first contemporary African writer on the global stage to have got an international book deal while still living in her home country.”


Al Jazeera English

Al Jazeera Journalist Back In Australia

Al-Jazeera journalist Peter Greste has returned to Brisbane, Australia, following his release from an Egyptian prison and has been reunited with his family following his release from an Egyptian prison.  At a news conference he praised the long campaign to free him and his colleagues and expressed relief.

Mr. Greste and two colleagues were arrested in 2013. They were convicted of spreading false news and aiding the banned Muslim Brotherhood.

The jailing of the journalists sparked an international outcry.

The three al-Jazeera journalists were arrested in 2013, after the military toppled the Muslim Brotherhood government, led by President Mohammed Morsi.

The men were convicted in 2014 of aiding the Brotherhood, which had been banned by Mr Morsi’s successor, President Abdul Fattah al-Sisi.

Mr. Fahmy and Mr. Greste were sentenced to seven years in prison and Mr Mohamed to 10. Their convictions were overturned on January 1st, but the men remained in custody pending a retrial.  All the defendants denied the charges against them and said their trial was a sham.