American Apparel Founder Sues Company After Being Ousted For Sexual Harassment


TYT Network

According to the L.A. Times, the yearlong battle between American Apparel Inc. and its founder Dov Charney has taken another twist. Charney filed a lawsuit accusing company officials and hedge fund Standard General of conspiring to push him out of the company last June.

According to The Huffington Post, Charney, who was fired last year in the wake of numerous sexual misconduct allegations, claimed in the lawsuit that the company’s investigation against him was not “independent.”

The lawsuit, part of a group of legal actions by both sides, alleges fraud and conspiracy, among other things. Charney is seeking damages of $100 million and wants agreements rescinded that gave control of his American Apparel stock to Standard General hedge fund and had him removed from the company’s board.

In other news, American Apparel’s new CEO, Paula Schneider, promised to meet with a Filipino American community service organization which threatened to go to court over former CEO Dov Charney’s alleged slurs against Filipino employees.

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-charney-lawsuit-20150625-story.html

http://globalnation.inquirer.net/125292/american-apparel-ceo-to-meet-with-fil-ams-on-charney-slurs

Unarmed Man Shot In Baltimore Suburb

Baltimore County police officers shot and killed an unarmed man in Baltimore suburb of Owings Mills early Thursday, writes the Baltimore Sun. The Herald-Standard claimed that the man was going to commit suicide.

The police were responding to a report of domestic violence at a home they had visited more than a dozen times over the past three years.

Spencer Lee McCain, 41, died about 8 a.m. at Sinai Hospital in Baltimore, police said.

The Herald-Standard:

“An unarmed black man killed by Baltimore County police told his girlfriend’s mother that he was going to commit suicide as officers were on their way to his home after reports of domestic violence, the mother said Thursday.”

Baltimore County Police Chief Jim Johnson said officers believed McCain was armed. However, they did not find a weapon on him, writes the Baltimore Sun.

Police received a 911 call about a possible domestic disturbance at the condominium in the 3000 block of Hunting Ridge Drive in Owings Mills shortly after 1 a.m., Johnson said. He said a 10-year-old child who lived at the home called a grandmother, who dialed 911.

Baltimore homicides map [Interactive]

He said the first officer to arrive knew of a history of domestic violence calls at the home. Since 2012, police said, officers responded to 911 calls for the address 17 times, including several reports of fighting.

(Updated title)

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/crime/blog/bs-md-co-police-involved-shooting-20150625-story.html

http://www.heraldstandard.com/united_states_ap/baltimore-co-police-kill-unarmed-man-after-suicide-threat/article_fe7d9e21-b096-5250-b94f-2cd1211da33d.html

TMZ: NFL Hall of Famer Warren Sapp Suspect In Domestic Violence Probe

0619-warren-sapp-tmz-01

NFL Hall of Famer Warren Sapp seems to be finding trouble off the field, TMZ reports.

The former Bucs and Raiders star defensive tackle has been named a suspect in a domestic violence probe in Las Vegas, TMZ Sports is reporting.  Law enforcement sources reportedly told TMZ that the woman appeared to have minor injuries.

The website, citing law enforcement sources, reported that Sapp is accused of getting into a physical altercation with a woman at a Vegas casino. The alleged incident took place on April 28.

http://www.tmz.com/2015/06/20/warren-sapp-suspect-domestic-violence-investigation-las-vegas-casino/

NFL Moves Extra Point To 15-yard line

NFL American Football team owners approved a Competition Committee’s proposal on extra points for the 2015 season, writes nfl.com.

The NFL announced the extra point will now be kicked from the 15-yard line as opposed to within the 10-yard line, with two-point conversions remaining at the 2-yard line.

The new rule also gives the defense the ability to score two points on returns.

According to the rule change, if the defense returns a blocked extra point or failed two-point try for a touchdown (i.e. on an interception), they will be awarded two points, writes nfl.com.

Under the previous rule, on a failed try, the ball was a “dead ball” and could not be moved.

NFL Vice President of Officiating Dean Blandino said teams could change their attempt decision if a penalty occurs.

The approved rule, which was decided by a 30-2 vote by owners, was one of three proposals considered by owners on Tuesday at the NFL’s Spring League Meeting, writes nfl.com.

Owners considered a proposal by the New England Patriots similar to the adopted plan, but without the defense’s ability to score. A plan proposed by the Philadelphia Eagles called for a 15-yard Point After Touchdown (PAT) and the ball on the 1-yard line for two-point tries.

The NFL has been tinkering with the PAT in hopes of making it a more difficult and therefore entertaining play for spectators. The latest change might be just the first step of further adjustments in years to come.

NFL Media Insider Ian Rapoport also reported that the Redskins‘ proposal to have roster cuts done all at once  – moving from 90-man to 53-man rosters prior to the start of the season – was voted down by owners, per a source.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000493347/article/nfl-moves-extra-point-to-15yard-line-for-2015-season

South African Leaders Visit Cook County Jail, Have Odd Question


Sam Seder

NBC / The Chicago Tribune had an interesting account of a South African delegation’s reaction after touring a Cook County, IL, jail facility. (The account was buried towards the end of an article about the Cook County criminal justice system.)

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/politics/ct-alvarez-dart-evans-preckwinkle-city-club-met-20150507-story.html

Daimler Introduces Self-Driving Truck For State Of Nevada


CNN

According to the Associated Press, it’s the first ever self-driving semi-truck licensed to drive on public roads — in this case Nevada’s highways — not only for testing, but business, too.

“Daimler Trucks North America LLC debuted the self-driving big rig Tuesday night with a drive — and a driver steering — atop the Hoover Dam on the Nevada-Arizona border,” writes the AP.

Taking a line from astronaut Neil Armstrong, Dr. Wolfgang Bernhard of Daimler Trucks and Buses told the crowd bused to the site from Las Vegas for a news conference that they were about to witness “a short drive for man and a long haul for mankind.”

(Updated report)

High Native American Suicide Rates On South Dakota Reservation

Teen suicide has become especially poignant for the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, located along the South Dakota-Nebraska border.

On Monday, the Associated Press reported that a string of seven teen suicides in recent months has deeply affected the impoverished reservation, writes the Christian Science Monitor .

The website colorlines.com paints the picture of the area of Oglala Lakota County even more drastically than the Associated Press.  “At least 11 children between the ages of 12 and 17 have committed suicide in my county since December. The heartbreaking details vary from child to child, but their families and this community—in the newly renamed Oglala Lakota County—feel the voids left by their absences just as deeply each and every time,” states colorlines.com.

Between December 1st and March 23rd, Pine Ridge Hospital treated 241 patients under 19 who actively planned, attempted or committed suicide. The numbers don’t account for unreported cases or for those who were treated in neighboring counties.  At this rate, 37 young people in a county that only has 5,393 inhabitants under 18 will be gone by the end of 2015.  Statistics from Pine Ridge Indian Health Services show teen suicide numbers have increased over the last seven years. In the same four-month period last year, for example, there were no suicides in Pine Ridge. In 2012, only one, states colorlines.com.

“The situation has turned into an epidemic,” Thomas Poor Bear, vice president of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, whose 24-year-old niece was one of two adults who also committed suicide this winter, told the Associated Press. “There are a lot of reasons behind it. The bullying at schools, the high unemployment rate. Parents need to discipline the children.”

Among native Americans ages 15 to 24, suicide rates are more than double the national average, according to The Christian Science Monitor.  The suicides are taking place amid a host of social problems including alcoholism and drug abuse, bullying, violence, high unemployment and school dropout rates, and high levels of poverty and deprivation.

Reversing a feeling of hopelessness is vital, advocates say.

More here

More African Americans Run For Local Government In Ferguson


MSNBC

MSNBC gives “All In” viewers a look at the history-making election in Ferguson, MO.

After months of upheaval, the beleaguered city of Ferguson, Missouri, has a new governing board. It looks different than the old one, states CNN.

After a higher-than-normal 30% turnout, two African-American candidates won their wards last Tuesday to make the six-member City Council 50% black.

Ferguson’s population of about 21,000 is 70% black, but the City Council was predominantly white, as is the police force.

Careers Put You At The Highest Risk For Suicide

According to a new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, there’s a lesser-known occupational hazard associated with certain jobs: suicide.

In the United States, suicide results in roughly 36,000 deaths per year.  Suicide became the leading cause of injury-related deaths back in 2009, according to Yahoo Health.

Worldwide, that statistic is close to one million per year. Recently, there’s been an uptick in workplace suicides, which is what the current research delves into.

Researchers examined the difference between workplace and non-workplace suicide rates in the United States between 2003 and 2010, based on numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Census of Fatal Occupational Injury database.

A little over 1,700 workers died as a result of workplace suicide over the eight-year span, which equated to a rough rate of 1.5 people per million members of the workforce, according to the American Journal of Preventative Medicine.

Men were more than 15 times more likely to commit suicide in the workplace, and the 65-74 demographic saw a four times greater risk than the 16-24 set.

According to author Hope M. Tiesman, Ph.D, the researchers discovered specific occupational fields that seem to bump the risk of workplace suicide.

Here’s what some of the study’s new statistics looked like, and some possible reasons for the higher rates based on past research, broken down by field:

Law enforcement officers = 5.3 per million

Roughly 85 percent of the deaths involved firearms, according to the study, which indicates easy access to weapons may play a role in higher suicide rates.

Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations = 5.1 per million

“Factors that may contribute to this risk include the potential for financial losses, chronic physical illness, social isolation, work/home imbalance, depression due to chronic pesticide exposure, and barriers and unwillingness to seek mental health treatment,” the authors write in their paper.

Installation, maintenance, and repair = 3.3 per million

As a broad category, installation, maintenance and repair saw higher-than-average numbers, but one sub-group saw a notably high suicide rate at 7.1 deaths per million workers. “A novel finding was that those in automotive maintenance and repair occupations also had significantly higher workplace suicide rates,” Tiesman says.

 “Occupation can define a person’s identity, and personal issues can creep into the workplace,” she says. “The lines between personal and work life are shrinking. We know that suicide is multifactorial in nature, and therefore need to take advantage of multiple opportunities to intervene in an individual’s life — including the workplace.”

According to Yahoo Health, “Mental-health professionals and employers should take special note of those individuals working in professions at high-risk of suicide.”

“[They] could consider the workplace as a potential site for suicide-prevention purposes, especially among the occupations at highest risk for workplace suicide,” says Tiesman.

In addition, Tiesman hopes the current study will highlight how blurred the lines between work and home life have become. “Occupational safety and health professionals should recognize that non-work factors can and do contribute to safety and health issues on the job,” she says.

Related: 15 Suicide-Attempt Survivors Tell Their Stories