3 Men Shot Execution-Style In Birmingham, Alabama

Korde Turner.jpg
Korde Lorodius Turner

Three men shot execution-style in a house in Birmingham, Alabama have now been identified.

The Jefferson County Coroner’s Office has identified the victims as Willie Cornelius Washington, 35, Johnny Kordara Griffin, 24 and Korde Lorodius Turner, 24. All were identified by family members, said Chief Deputy Coroner Bill Yates.

The bodies were found inside the home at 457 3rd Street North at 12:05 p.m. Monday. They were officially pronounced dead at 12:58 p.m., according to al.com.

al.com writes that Washington was found dead on the floor just inside the front door where it appears he had been sleeping prior to his death. He was lying on a pillow with a blanket on top of him. Griffin and Turner were found lying on couches. Police recovered all three bullets underneath each of the victims, writes al.com.

In 2013, Turner was acquitted for the 2009 murder of another man.  On April 10, 2009, Leroy “Little Fred” Yarbrough was shot in the chest while in the 300 block of Fourth Terrace North in Smithfield.  Turner admitted to shooting Yarbrough in self-defense, and that was his only arrest, according to al.com.

No arrests have been made in the killings, said Birmingham police spokesman Lt. Sean Edwards. Police are looking into several tips.

http://www.al.com/news/birmingham/index.ssf/2015/05/3_men_shot_execution-style_in.html

Unregistered Taxi Driver Sexually Assaulted Woman And Demanded £50 Fare To Take Her Home

Mohamed Iqbal was jailed at Guildford Crown Court (Picture: PA Real Life Features)

A university student is warning others against using unregistered taxis in England after she fell victim to a predatory cab driver who sexually assaulted her.

Lily Wright, 22, from Birmingham has waived her right to anonymity to share her terrifying experience and to urge others not to take unlicensed cabs.

Lily and her friend Jamielee Smalldon, 21, had flagged down a taxi, driven by Mohammed Iqbal – a father of three – following a night out in Birmingham.

After dropping Jamielee at her house, Iqbal drove Lily to a secluded wooded area and sexually assaulted her, according to the U.K Daily Mail.

He then drove her home – after he ordered her to pay him £50 for the return fare.  “It was disgusting and I was convinced he was going to kill me.”  “After what he’d just done to me, I couldn’t believe he had the nerve to charge me,” she said, according to the Birmingham Mail.

Iqbal first pleaded not guilty to two separate sex attacks – one on Lily, and another on a second woman at another time.  He later changed his plea to guilty.

“The next day police revealed the court had presented the evidence, and my attacker had changed his plea to guilty to two counts of sexual assault and one count of kidnap,” said Wright.

“I believe women should trust taxi drivers, and take a taxi rather than walking home alone at night,” says Wright.  “But they should book a registered taxi rather than waving one down in the street,” she said.  “You’re putting your safety in their hands. And I learnt my lesson the hard way.”

http://www.tkgnews.com/unlicensed-cab-driver-sexually-assaulted-student-before-demanding-50-to-take-her-home/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2971865/Student-reveals-taxi-driver-took-isolated-woodland-sexually-assaulted-demanded-50-fare-home.html#ixzz3T0N6gDty

The Birmingham Church Bombing And Its Bizarre Convictions

On Sept. 15, 1963, there was a bombing at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama.  It was one of the most bizarre crimes of the civil rights movement. 

The men convicted of the crime did not go to jail until decades later.

The Baptist church was a center for civil rights meetings, and just a few days earlier, courts had ordered the desegregation of Birmingham’s schools.

Four young girls attending Sunday school—Denise McNair, Cynthia Wesley, Carol Robertson, and Addie Mae Collins, aged 11 to 14—were killed when a bomb exploded at the church. Twenty others were injured. 

Bobby Frank Cherry, a demolitions expert, and three other white supremacists—Robert Chambliss, Thomas Blanton, and Herman Cash—were under investigation within days of the bombing.

However, two years later, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover declined to pursue the case, saying the chances for conviction were “remote.” In 1968, federal authorities shut down the investigation.

In the 1970s, after a U.S. Justice Department investigation revealed that Hoover had blocked evidence, Jefferson County, Ala., prosecutors reopened the case.

More than a decade-and-a-half after the crime, the ringleader, Robert Chambliss, was convicted of one count of murder in the death of Denise McNair in 1977. He died in prison in 1985 without ever publicly admitting a role in the bombing.  Herman Cash died in 1994 and was never tried.

The remaining two suspects in the case, Thomas Blanton and Bobby Frank Cherry, were finally indicted in 2000—more than two decades after Chambliss’s conviction—when an FBI agent in Birmingham obtained more than 9,000 FBI documents and surveillance tapes that had been kept from the original prosecutors.

Blanton was convicted of murder in 2001 and sentenced to life in prison. In Cherry’s trial, several of his relatives came forward to testify against him. Cherry had bragged to a number of them over the years about the bombing. In 2002, he was convicted of four counts of murder and sentenced to life in prison, where he died in 2004.

http://www.infoplease.com/spot/bhmjustice3.html#ixzz3Bt69vpFF