Is ISIS In Kuwait?

A Kuwaiti man reacts at the site of the suicide bombing.

A suicide bomber killed 25 people and wounded 202 when he blew himself up inside a packed Shi’ite Muslim mosque in Kuwait city on Friday, according to Reuters.  It was the first attack of its kind in the major oil-exporting country.

The Islamic State militant group claimed responsibility for the attack in the eastern part of the Kuwaiti capital.

Parliament member Khalil al-Salih, who was at the mosque when the attack occurred, said worshippers were kneeling in prayer when the bomber walked into the Imam al-Sadeq Mosque and detonated his explosives, destroying walls and the ceiling.

“It was obvious from the suicide bomber’s body that he was young. He walked into the prayer hall during sujood (kneeling in prayer). He looked…in his 20s…” he said, according to Reuters.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/06/26/us-kuwait-blast-idUSKBN0P618L20150626

Search Continues For Unbiased Jury In Tsarnaev Trial

How selecting a jury really works

The courts are in the process of choosing the jury for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

Tsarnaev is an accused terrorist.  Authorities say he and his brother set off two pressure cooker bombs at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon.

The courts need to walk a fine line when selecting a jury, because this case may involve the death penalty.

Massachusetts abolished the death penalty more than 30 years ago and last carried out a death sentence in 1947, according to CNN.  Some claim that Boston has a brutal, eye-for-an-eye past and the jury may choose execution.

This case is not a state case, but rather a federal case and the death penalty is still allowed.

There’s ambivalence about capital punishment in Boston’s DNA, and that makes picking a jury to decide Tsarnaev’s fate all the more challenging.

So the state might not have the death penalty, but the feds do.  His crimes, if he is convicted, include the murder of an 8-year-old boy – raising the bar for heinousness and cruelty.

The people with the strongest opinions – those on the extreme ends of the juror questionnaire rating scale – are the least likely to make the jury.

A 2013 poll by the Boston Globe showed that just a third of Boston’s residents favor the death penalty for Tsarnaev; two-thirds would choose life in prison as his sentence.

It’s a story that has been underscored, one by one, by those called to serve on Tsarnaev’s jury. They sit at the end of a long wooden conference table, surrounded by lawyers and a jury consultant as they answer questions posed by U.S. District Court Judge George O’Toole. When he is finished, he passes the prospect off to the lawyers. CNN claims that with many potential jurors, their body language says “deer in the headlights.”

Many have difficulty with the question.

It has taken 19 days of juror interviews to reach this point: The court announced Friday that it expects to empanel a jury early next week. The trial itself, with opening statements and the first witnesses, is expected to begin the week of March 2.

Massachusetts as a state hasn’t executed anyone since 1947 and wiped the death penalty off its books in 1984. But its past is far more varied. It was one of the first colonies to carry out the death penalty, hanging murderer John Billington in Plymouth in 1630. In all, Massachusetts has executed 345 people. Until 1951, first-degree murder carried a mandatory death sentence, and some Tsarnaev jury prospects who still think that is the case.

Indeed, the executions in Massachusetts seem to reflect the worst fears of their times. Mary Dyer was one the so-called “Boston martyrs” hanged in 1660 under a law that banned Quakers from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Then came the pirates and witches: 19 women were hanged in 1692 alone in the infamous Salem witch trials. Two Italian-born anarchists, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, were executed in the electric chair in 1927 amid a huge public outcry spurred by writers, academics and celebrities of the time; many people believed them innocent.

Airstrikes Over The Weekend

CF-18
Canadian CF-18s

The United States carried out three airstrikes against ISIS militants in Syria on Saturday and Sunday using fighter jets, according to the U.S. Central Command. In a separate offensive, U.S. military forces used bombers, fighter jets and helicopters to conduct six airstrikes against ISIS in Iraq, CENTCOM said.

The strikes in Syria destroyed an ISIS bulldozer, two ISIS tanks, another ISIS vehicle and six ISIS attack positions, CENTCOM said in a release. The strikes in Iraq hit two mortar teams, a large ISIS unit, two smaller ISIS groups, and destroyed a total of three ISIS Humvees. CENTCOM said all of the friendly aircraft used in the attacks “departed the strike areas safely.”

Friday, multiple armored personnel carriers which had been controlled by the terrorist group were destroyed. That was the same day that ISIS revealed it had beheaded United Kingdom citizen Alan Henning.

The airstrikes were conducted by the United States, using both manned aircrafts and drones, although CENTCOM said that Saudi Arabia, Jordan, and the United Arab Emirates lent support.

The anti-ISIS coalition has grown slightly larger in recent days. Friday, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced his country would launch airstrikes in Iraq and possibly Syria, depending on whether the Syrian government gave permission.

“We will strike ISIL where, and only where, Canada has the clear support of the government of that country. At present, that is only true in Iraq,” said Harper. “If it were to become the case in Syria, then we would participate in airstrikes in that country also.”

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott also announced that it would participate in airstrikes against ISIS on Friday. Like Harper, Abbott said Australia would only launch attacks in Iraq for now, leaving Syria untouched.

One Year Gone: Rand Paul On Airstrikes Over Syria

The Islamic State is considered a Syrian “rebel” group.  

About a year ago, the U.S. was considering airstrikes against the Bashar al-Assad regime in Syria.  The president had even said that Assad had crossed a “red line” with chemical weapons.   

However, now the U.S. finds itself bombing one of Assad’s enemies – the Islamic State – in Iraq.  The U.S. is also making surveillance flights over Syria (supposedly to prepare to bomb the Islamic State in Syria).  

Though numerous critics including Hillary Clinton have claimed that the U.S. should have bombed the Assad regime, we now find the U.S. and the Assad regime with a common enemy – the Islamic State.  I.S. is considered a Syrian “rebel” group.  Assad and the Islamic State are enemies. 

This puts the U.S. in an awkward position. 

Should the U.S. try to become Assad’s ally?  Or should the U.S. declare both groups their enemy?

One more thing – Syria’s foreign minister warned the U.S. not to enter Syrian air space.

“A top Syrian official said Monday any U.S. airstrikes without consent from Syria would be considered an aggression” an AP report said.

Syria is a different place than is was just a year ago.  Below is a video from a year ago with Rand Paul about the Syrian situation.   

The Birmingham Church Bombing And Its Bizarre Convictions

On Sept. 15, 1963, there was a bombing at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama.  It was one of the most bizarre crimes of the civil rights movement. 

The men convicted of the crime did not go to jail until decades later.

The Baptist church was a center for civil rights meetings, and just a few days earlier, courts had ordered the desegregation of Birmingham’s schools.

Four young girls attending Sunday school—Denise McNair, Cynthia Wesley, Carol Robertson, and Addie Mae Collins, aged 11 to 14—were killed when a bomb exploded at the church. Twenty others were injured. 

Bobby Frank Cherry, a demolitions expert, and three other white supremacists—Robert Chambliss, Thomas Blanton, and Herman Cash—were under investigation within days of the bombing.

However, two years later, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover declined to pursue the case, saying the chances for conviction were “remote.” In 1968, federal authorities shut down the investigation.

In the 1970s, after a U.S. Justice Department investigation revealed that Hoover had blocked evidence, Jefferson County, Ala., prosecutors reopened the case.

More than a decade-and-a-half after the crime, the ringleader, Robert Chambliss, was convicted of one count of murder in the death of Denise McNair in 1977. He died in prison in 1985 without ever publicly admitting a role in the bombing.  Herman Cash died in 1994 and was never tried.

The remaining two suspects in the case, Thomas Blanton and Bobby Frank Cherry, were finally indicted in 2000—more than two decades after Chambliss’s conviction—when an FBI agent in Birmingham obtained more than 9,000 FBI documents and surveillance tapes that had been kept from the original prosecutors.

Blanton was convicted of murder in 2001 and sentenced to life in prison. In Cherry’s trial, several of his relatives came forward to testify against him. Cherry had bragged to a number of them over the years about the bombing. In 2002, he was convicted of four counts of murder and sentenced to life in prison, where he died in 2004.

http://www.infoplease.com/spot/bhmjustice3.html#ixzz3Bt69vpFF