Photos Of ‘Suicide Squad’ Cast

Here are photos of the cast for the upcoming move ‘Suicide Squad,’ with Jared Leto as The Joker.

In the movie, a secret government agency recruits imprisoned “super-villains” to carry out dangerous missions in exchange for clemency.  It is scheduled for release on August 5th, 2016.

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Band From Movie ‘Singles’ Is Getting An Official Release


TheJimEMusic

Citizen Dick: Touch Me I’m Dick

Citizen Dick was the fictional grunge band featured in Cameron Crowe’s 1992 hit film Singles.

They are getting a 7-inch release for Record Store Day. The vinyl will feature “Touch Me I’m Dick” — the full version of which surfaced a few years ago — on the A-side and an etching of a quote from the film on the B-side.

The “real” Citizen Dick featured Eddie Vedder, Stone Gossard, and Jeff Ament of Pearl Jam.

Sources state It will come out on 4/18 via Legacy Recordings with the rest of the Record Store Day releases.

More:

http://www.stereogum.com/1789616/singles-band-citizen-dick-is-getting-an-official-release-for-record-store-day/news/

(Updated post)

Teacher Goes To Jail For Showing A Bad Movie


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“A former substitute teacher convicted of showing a movie including graphic sex and violence to a high school class was sentenced on Wednesday to 90 days in jail,” according to the Huffington Post.

The teacher should be disciplined by the school, but should she be put in jail?

Sheila Kearns, who was convicted in January of four felony counts, showed it to her Spanish classes at Columbus’ East High School in April 2013.

The movie, “The ABCs of Death,” consists of 26 chapters, each depicting some form of grisly death, states The Huffington Post.

Kearns, who showed the movie during five periods of the class, was convicted of “disseminating matter harmful to juveniles,” according to The Huffington Post.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that the judge placed her on probation for three years but made the jail time a condition of probation.

Authorities In India Prevent Rape Documentary From Being Shown

Authorities in India stopped the domestic broadcast of a British documentary about the gang rape of a young woman in Delhii, according to The Guardian.

The British director of the hard-hitting documentary has appealed to the Indian prime minister, Narendra Modi, to intervene.

Leslee Udwin, whose documentary India’s Daughter, is scheduled to be broadcast internationally on Sunday, made an emotional plea to Modi “to deal with this unceremonious silencing of the film” in India.

The movie is based on the brutal rape of 23-year-old physiotherapy student Jyoti Singh from December 2012.   Udwin’s documentary includes interviews Mukesh Singh, one of the men convicted for the crime, who is now in prison in Delhi and waiting for the supreme court to hear his appeal against the death sentence.

In the film, Singh suggests his victim would not have been killed if she had not fought back against her attackers and appears to blame her for not behaving like “a decent girl”.

“You can’t clap with one hand,” said Mr. Singh, who was convicted of rape and murder, though he denied taking part in the assault. “It takes two hands. A decent girl won’t roam around at 9 o’clock at night. A girl is far more responsible for rape than a boy. Boy and girl are not equal. Housework and housekeeping is for girls, not roaming in discos and bars at night doing wrong things, wearing wrong clothes. About 20 percent of girls are good.”

Those and other comments by Singh were released as part of a publicity campaign for the film, according to The New York Times.  They were met with outrage in India, partly because the filmmaker, Leslee Udwin, had been permitted to interview the defendant in jail.

After complaints by the home minister, an Indian court issued a restraining order, stating that Mr. Singh’s interview created “an atmosphere of fear and tension with the possibility of public outcry and law and order situation.”  The order said the film violated four Indian statutes, including one against “intent to cause alarm in the public” and another banning acts “intended to outrage the modesty of a woman.”

The filmmaker said the order amounted to a ban.

More:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/04/world/asia/delhi-gang-rape-mukesh-singh.html?_r=0

Film Director James Cameron And Wife Create America’s First All Vegan School

Say Hello to America's First All Vegan School, Thanks to James Cameron

Coming fall of 2015, MUSE school in Calabasas, California will be the first school in America serving an entirely plant-based menu to their students.

The school, which opened its doors in 2006, has two campuses and was founded by Rebecca Amis and Suzy Amis Cameron, wife of famed film producer and “Titanic” director, James Cameron.

With a strong seed-to-table program already in place and lots of flourishing gardens tended to by the students, the plan to guide the entire menu toward an entirely whole foods, plant-based one has been in the works for the last year and a half.

Review: The Boy Next Door

Some sources are claiming the Jennifer Lopez movie The Boy Next Door is certain to induce groans.

Connect Savannah claims it is reminiscent of the dopey ‘women in peril’ thrillers from the years surrounding Y2K. Like bombs that featured the slumming likes of Angelina Jolie, Halle Berry and Ashley Judd.

The movie stars Lopez as Claire Peterson, a high school teacher living alone with her teenage son Kevin (Ian Nelson) in the aftermath of learning about her husband Garrett’s (John Corbett) infidelity.

Husband Garrett admits he made a mistake and wants to reconcile, but Claire is torn between giving him another chance or divorcing. When hunky Noah Sandborn (Ryan Guzman) moves in next door to tend to his grandfather (Jack Wallace), Claire is interested in him.

Noah is 19 years old, but life circumstances (namely, the deaths of his parents) have led to him still being in high school. Nevertheless, Noah’s hot for teacher, and when he makes a pass at her, she responds favorably. The morning after their sexual encounter, Claire realizes she made a mistake.

Connect Savannah:

“It’s at this precise point Noah goes from 0 to 60 mph on the psycho scale.”

Variety:

“No sooner has she attempted the next morning’s walk of shame, however, than Noah turns on a dime into an obsessive stalker, appearing unannounced at her home and somehow getting a seat in her high-school literature class. The film’s initial formulaic competence gives way to outright preposterousness rather quickly, hinging on idiot-plot character motivations, ‘It was only a cat!’ jump scares and computer files that may as well be labeled ‘Evil Schemes, 2012-2014.’”

Connect Savannah:

“As for Claire, she’s the typical dunderheaded heroine found in thrillers of this low caliber, making so many mistakes in dealing with her stalker that you wonder how she can possibly possess the brainpower to master a light switch, let alone teach Homer to bored teens.”

Screen Daily:

“With Rob Cohen (The Fast And The Furious) directing from a clunky script by Barbara Curry, the film morphs from would-be sexy melodrama to harder edged thriller and ends up with a near-horror climax.”

Deadline Hollywood: How Is American Sniper Doing Overseas?

According to Deadline Hollywood, Clint Eastwood’s American Sniper opened in the Middle East on January 22nd.

The website states that in Iraq, where much of Chris Kyle’s story takes place, the film has reflected the bitter political divisions in the country. In Baghdad, the management of Iraqi Cinemas, which operates a four-screen theater there, pulled the film ahead of its scheduled opening for fear of inciting protests and violence.

In the Kurdish cities of Irbil, Suleimaniya and Dohuk, however, American Sniper has opened strongly, second only to Liam Neeson-starrer Taken 3.

To give a sense of the complexity of politics in the country, Iraqi Cinemas actually operates the three-screen theater in Dohuk and had no problem releasing the film there, despite its own self-imposed Baghdad ban.

One film executive who operates theaters in Iraq says, “The Kurds don’t like the Baghdadis that much so they have no big problem seeing them getting shot by an American. So far, the film is working well for our screens in Kurdistan.”

In Lebanon, American Sniper opened uncut and at number one with over 3100 tickets sold on its first day alone, ahead of local Lebanese hit Single, Married, Divorced.

Elsewhere, across the region, the film is facing a mixed reception. It opened in the UAE, Qatar and Kuwait, albeit with cuts, particularly to a contentious scene involving a Koran. The film was initially rejected by censors in Jordan, which borders Iraq and contains a significant Iraqi population estimated at 200,000 or 4-5% of the population.

There are plans to re-submit the film to censors in the coming days with more cuts to enable the film to get the greenlight to be released in time for next weekend.

The film opened strongly this week in the U.K. and previously gave Eastwood his biggest ever opening in Italy.

Warner Bros has used much of the same powerful emotional marketing materials that scored well with American audiences in the international roll-out and tried to focus on the personal dimensions rather than the political aspects of the story.

Long-Lost Hitchcock War Documentary Uncovered

There will be a new HBO documentary about the discovery of the German concentration camps at the end of World War II will be shown on January 27th, 2015.  The HBO documentary, Night Will Fall, was directed by André Singer and narrated by Helena Bonham Carter and Jasper Britton, tells the story of how a lost film came back to life.

The HBO film is about a “lost” documentary directed by none other than Alfred Hitchcock titled German Concentration Camps: Factual Survey.

According to The Daily Beast, Sidney Bernstein, the chief of the Psychological Warfare Film Section of the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force, was commissioned to create the documentary chronicling the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps in 1945.

His goal was, in his words, to “prove one day that this had actually happened” and have it serve as “a lesson to all mankind as well as to the Germans.”

He eventually brought in his good friend Alfred Hitchcock to be the film’s supervising director.

However, the horrifying and heartbreaking footage of numerous concentration camps, shot by British, American, and Russian World War II soldiers as they were being liberated, became tangled up in a complicated web of politics and artistic rows.

The new HBO documentary rediscovers and uses footage from German Concentration Camps: Factual Survey.

The film-on-a-film, called Night Will Fall, will premiere January 27th, 2015 on HBO. It is narrated by Helena Bonham Carter, produced by Stephen Frears and Brett Ratner, and directed by Andre Singer, who serves as president of The Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and who executive produced the documentaries The Act of Killing and Werner Herzog’s Into the Abyss.

It was done in concert with London’s Imperial War Museum and took 18 months of looking through thousands of feet of film to trace the making of the unmade epic.

“When I first saw material, it was shattering to see; a horrific experience,” Singer tells The Daily Beast. “I’ve been in the film world a long time and seen lots and lots of footage and you think you’ll get anesthetized to it, but that isn’t the case. This is something that is once seen, never forgotten.”

Singer’s documentary opens with footage from German Concentration Camps: Factual Survey of the British 11th Armored Division liberating the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Northern Germany on April 15, 1945. There, the Allied troops discovered a strange sight.

“Neat and tidy orchards. Well-stocked farms lined the wayside. And the British soldier did not fail to admire the place, and its inhabitants—at least, until he began to feel a smell,” says a narrator in voiceover.

The decommissioned film was resurrected for the HBO documentary.  Authorized in the spring of 1945 by the Allied forces, German Concentration Camps Factual Survey captured the monstrous realities found during the liberation of Nazi death camps, including Bergen-Belsen, Dachau and Auschwitz.

Yet by August of that year, the film was shelved by British authorities. Everything—reels of footage, the script, the cameramen’s notes—was boxed up and buried in the archives of the Imperial War Museums (IWM) in London.

After the American and British governments approved his film, Bernstein handpicked a powerhouse team, including Alfred Hitchcock and other influential filmmakers.  They had just three months to complete the documentary from footage captured by British, American and Russian cameramen.

Night Will Fall shows many of these scenes, and they are rife with unspeakable details: Dead bodies are strewn across plots of land, some in heaps and others lined up like a carpet of human carcasses.

German Concentration Camps Factual Survey is Hitchcock’s only known documentary feature. Though his tenure on the film lasted just one month, he made lasting contributions, helping to outline the story and emphasizing the importance of showing just how close the concentration camps were to picturesque villages where German civilians lived during the war.

Hitchcock wanted the film to be as believable and irrefutable as possible to ensure that the massacre of 11 million people, including 6 million Jews, would never be forgotten.

In the summer of 1945, plans for German Concentration Camps Factual Survey began to unravel. The American government grew impatient with Bernstein’s slow, meticulous process and pulled its footage, hiring its own director, Billy Wilder, to create a shorter film.

Wilder’s Death Mills premiered in Wurzberg following an operetta with Lillian Harvey. Of the 500-odd people in the audience at the beginning of the screening, less than 100 were in their seats at the end.

Bernstein’s work had also become a political headache for American and British officials. The consensus was that the film was no longer necessary.

“Policy at the moment in Germany is entirely in the direction of encouraging, stimulating and interesting the Germans out of their apathy, and there are people around the Commander-in-Chief who will say ‘No atrocity film,’” read a memo Bernstein received on August 4, 1945, from the British Foreign Office. German Concentration Camps: Factual Survey was shelved in September 1945, though its footage was key evidence in the trials of Nazi war criminals.

Four years ago, the Imperial War Museum began restoring and completing Bernstein and Hitchcock’s film, as they had originally envisioned it, including the sixth reel, which was unfinished when the project was shut down. Night Will Fall ends with a scene from the now-completed documentary German Concentration Camps: Factual Survey.  A large group of civilians (it’s unclear who) walk through one of the camps, passing by decaying bodies on both sides of the road. As the camera zooms in on the grotesque faces of the dead, the narrator speaks: “Unless the world learns the lesson these pictures teach, night will fall. But by God’s grace, we who live will learn.”

Some Independent Theaters Are Showing ‘The Interview’

“The Interview” was put back into theaters Tuesday when Sony Pictures Entertainment announced a limited Christmas Day theatrical release for the comedy.

AP video.