Shootout At Gun Store In Kansas City

Sources claim that police are investigating after a store owner was killed and three men were shot during a robbery attempt at a Shawnee self-defense shop Friday afternoon.

The shooting happened about 2:10 p.m. Friday at She’s a Pistol, located at 5725 Nieman Road, when four men tried to rob the store.

Police said the male store owner was shot. Jon Bieker was taken to the hospital in critical condition where he later died. Two would-be robbers suffered critical injuries in an apparent shootout with the owners. Major Dan Tennis with the Shawnee Police Department said two other men ran from the store.

Video by YouHitNews

Is Hunting A ‘White Sport?’

Eric Morris, the founder and president of the Black Wolf Hunting Club, is on a mission to get more African-Americans involved in hunting. He led a group last weekend on a hunting preserve.

Ridgeway, MO.

Is hunting a “whites only” sport?

Almost, because federal surveys show that less than 5 percent of all participants are black.

According to the Kansas City Star, a man named Eric Morris founded a hunting club – called the Black Wolf Hunting Club – in order to attract more African-Americans to hunting.

“There’s a huge perception that blacks don’t hunt,” said Morris, who led a group of hunters at the Harding Gamebirds hunting preserve in northern Missouri. “I know that’s what the surveys say. But look at this.”

He motioned to the black family he was leading on a hunting trip.  “This is proof that blacks can have a great time hunting. We just have to give them the opportunity.”

Sommari Muwwakkil celebrated with his daughters Eshante (from left), Inkera, Sommyia and Mikhia after shooting a pheasant last weekend at the Harding Gamebirds hunting preserve in northern Missouri. They participated in a hunt organized by the Black Wolf Hunting Club to introduce more African-Americans to hunting.

Through the Black Wolf Hunting Club, Morris and others attempt to provide that opportunity. They organize trips to preserves, where participants pay to hunt pen-raised birds, and introduce blacks young and not-so-young to hunting.

For many, it’s a unique experience. They weren’t brought up with hunting, as they were with fishing, Morris said.

Not feeling comfortable in rural settings, a lack of access, prejudice, the lack of role models — those are all excuses Morris has heard from fellow blacks as to why they don’t hunt.

Morris, who now lives in Platte City, didn’t face those barriers. He grew up in Alabama and taught himself to hunt.

Now he helps others discover the excitement of the sport.

“I had a life-long desire to go hunting,” said Sommari Muwwakkil, on a hunting trip with Morris. “I was brought up in Kansas City, and I didn’t know where to get started.

“Some landowners don’t trust African-Americans, and they aren’t going to give you access. And some of the public areas get hit so hard that it’s tough for a beginner to get out.

“So I really felt lost.”

But that changed, he said, when he met Morris.

After Morris gave a talk to a youth group, Muwwakkil approached him and asked him questions about getting started in hunting. Morris invited Muwwakkil to participate in a hunt, and he jumped at the chance.

Workers at Harding Gamebirds stocked pheasants and chukars in the thick strips of cover, then guide Jim Sparks released his chocolate Lab, Sarge, and his two English setters, Pete and Sid. It wasn’t long before the bird dogs picked up the scent and were on point.

Hunters flushed the birds and took turns shooting, keeping safety in mind. Shots rang out, birds fell and happy hunters watched as the dogs retrieved the game.

One of Muwwakkil’s daughters, Eshante, was among the successful.

“At first, I didn’t know how I would like this,” she said. “I was scared of shooting at first. I though the kick from a shotgun would hurt.

“But we started by shooting at clays (targets).Then when I went hunting, I loved it.”

She paused and laughed. “I think the boys are jealous that they don’t get to go,” she said. “They call me a hunting beast.”

Thomas, a major in the Army who is stationed at Fort Leavenworth, also is happy that Morris recruited him.

“I had deer hunted back home in South Carolina, but I had never been bird hunting,” he said. “It takes some getting used to.

“…but once you get used to it, it’s a lot of fun.”

That’s the kind of reaction Morris seeks. He has a passion for introducing blacks to hunting, even if he has to do it one person at a time.

“Seeing these kids come out here and have a great time, that’s special,” he said. “If we could get more blacks to come out and at least give hunting a chance, I think we could change the way people see things.

“I think there is untapped potential there.”

More:

http://www.kansascity.com/sports/outdoors/article4741914.html#storylink=cpy

Kansas Secretary Of State: Immigration Reform Today, Ethnic Cleansing Tomorrow?

“Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, a leader in an anti-immigrant movement, agreed with a caller during his Sunday radio program that it’s possible that a Hispanic majority in the U.S. could conduct an ‘ethnic cleansing.’

Kobach made his remarks in response to a right-wing caller who asked, “What happens, if you know your history, when one culture or one race or one religion overwhelms another culture or race?”

Kobach understood:  the caller was worried about ethnic cleansing.

“What protects us in America from any kind of ethnic cleansing is the rule of law, of course,” Kobach said. “And the rule of law used to be unassailable, used to be taken for granted in America. And now, of course, we have a President who disregards the law when it suits his interests…”

http://www.kansascity.com/opinion/opn-columns-blogs/barbara-shelly/article4038339.html#storylink=cpy

http://www.kansascity.com/opinion/opn-columns-blogs/barbara-shelly/article4038339.html

Kansas Tea Party Attempts Extortion on State GOP

U.S. Senate candidate Milton Wolf posted a collection of gruesome X-ray images of gunshot fatalities and medical injuries to his Facebook page and participated in online commentary with macabre jokes and descriptions of carnage.

WolfKansas1

Wolf, a Johnson County radiologist anchoring a campaign for the Republican nomination with calls for federal heath care reform, said in an interview the medical images were legally uploaded to public social media sites and other online venues for educational purposes. They also served, he said, to demonstrate evil lurking in the world.

However, Wolf – who is running as a Tea Party candidate – and others viewing these Facebook postings relentlessly poked fun at the dead or wounded. The gunshot victim, Wolf joked online, wasn’t going to complain about the awkward positioning of his head for an X-ray. In a separate Facebook comment, Wolf wrote that an X-ray of a man decapitated by gunfire resembled a wounded alien in a “Terminator” film and that the image offered evidence people “find beauty in different things.”

Wolf declined in an interview with The Topeka Capital-Journal to clearly answer questions about whether he continued to place images of deceased people on the Internet. He asked to keep copies of the Facebook posts shown to him, but when denied, he walked away.

Majority Report / Sam Seder video.