Is The U.S. Media Accurately Portraying Obamacare And The King v. Burwell Lawsuit Against It?


TYT Network

By the end of June, the Supreme Court is expected to issue its decision in King v. Burwell, the case that centers on whether the Internal Revenue Service can allow payment of Affordable Care Act subsidies to individuals enrolled in the federal exchange.

The lawsuit is widely considered to be based on a technicality. The actual law reads “state exchanges” as opposed to “federal exchange.”

Should the Court rule against the Obama administration, subsidies no longer would be available to individuals who purchased coverage through HealthCare.gov, the federal website, in the 34 states that chose not to establish their own state-based exchanges, writes The Daily Signal.

It also would mean the Obamacare employer mandate would be effectively unenforceable, according to The Daily Signal.

Things would probably get ugly if that happens. Democrats would probably go on the offensive, blaming Republicans for “every case of a person who lost coverage just before giving birth, or having another round of chemo,” according to nhpr.org.

Some people – such as Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin – have said, however, that King v. Burwell may not destroy Obamacare, because Congress would feel compelled to legislate a fix with a bill.

http://dailysignal.com/2015/06/02/theres-broad-public-support-for-congress-to-reduce-insurance-costs-in-response-to-king-v-burwell/

http://nhpr.org/post/4-reasons-both-parties-should-be-sweating-bullets-over-king-v-burwell

http://thehill.com/homenews/senate/244369-gop-fears-it-will-win-obamacare-court-battle

Are Millennials Overly Confident About Their Finances?


TYT Network

There are differing opinions about whether overconfidence is good for humanity.

Some say that believing that you’re better than you really are is a self-fulfilling prophecy that’s good for ambition and swift decision-making.

Overconfidence can lead to boosts in social status, and overconfident populations have been shown to be more evolutionarily stable. Some argue that overconfidence leads to hubris, self-deception, and blind spots in decision making.

In behavioral finance, overconfidence for traders can lead to risky stock picks and overtrading. But what about personal finance?